Fat Loss For Women: Part 3 Chemical Oestrogen Limitation Tips

Leanne C- My Experience 2014 – Part Three

LC

Read – Fat Loss For Women: Part 1 – here

Read – Fat Loss For Women : Part Two Nutrition Suggested for Oestrogen Metabolism – here

After embarking on a ‘Lean to Leaner’ Challenge in January 2014 this year, I decided to study the role gender can have with regards to ‘Health and Nutrition’ and ‘Fat Loss’.  In particular why I store fat around my hips, thighs and legs, and what steps can I take to help combat my problem.

I hope you find this useful!

My Blog moves onto the subject of how I limit myself from chemical and environmental oestrogen. Again based on my own personal experiences I will share with you some of the things I do, and continue to do in my quest for a lean lower body.

After the realisation that my fat storage around my hips and thighs could have a link to excess oestrogen in my body , I then moved onto thinking about ‘environmental oestrogen’s‘ and ‘chemical oestrogen‘. Mainly wanting the answers to the following questions…

1. What is chemical oestrogen?

2. What is environmental oestrogen? and where are they found?

3. Most importantly, how can I reduce my exposure to compounds that could potentially be adding to my problem of fat loss in my lower body?

1. What is chemical oestrogen?

Basically these are chemicals that will imitate or mimic the affects of oestrogen in the body. For me I want to limit my exposure to these types of chemicals as already I have an oestrogen dominance issue.

2. What is environmental oestrogen? and where are they found?

After a quick GOOGLE you can easily find out that you may be exposed to environmental oestrogen in substances such as food dyes, some cosmetics, detergents and tap water (there are more but these were my main concerns).

So for me, I didn’t need to go into in-depth research at this time but I know that I wanted to limit my exposure to these compounds as much as possible. It would be totally impossible for me to completely abstain from tap water, (practical purposes): however being aware of this makes me more conscious of my daily choices.

During my gym session, running out of water, I am going to use the water fountain (filtered or not) because at that moment in time it would be more important for me to replenish fluids than to abstain from tap water. So again, is a conscious effort but not over thinking it, and making a better judgement at that moment in time.

3. How can I reduce my exposure to compounds that could potentially be adding to my problem of fat loss in my lower body?

So the most important part here for me would be first of all to become aware of what I was putting into my body. Become aware of the chemicals I use in my home, in my environment and read labels to find out what exactly is in the product I am using.

Some ideas for me to think about were…

  • using BPA free drinking bottle and food containers?
  • drinking filtered water?
  • using organic meats/fruit/veg to limit pesticide exposure etc?

 

BPA FREE CONTAINERS

First of all, all BPA free plastic containers will be clearly labelled with the following logo.

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BPA free means that plastic does not contain bisphenol A, which is an oestrogen mimicking chemical compound. However there is still a debate ongoing weather BPA free plastics are the best route to take. I myself have switched to BPA free to reduce exposure to the bisphenol A compound.

BPS that is found in BPA free water bottles has not been tested as much as the BPA compound at the moment, and I have struggled to find research into BPA free and the safety of this plastic. Alternatives to this would be to use glass jars as storage (not practical for lunches on the go or transporting your water around the gym).

So for now, I am on the BPA free route with my storage containers and portable water bottle is also BPA free, with an added bonus of having a carbon filter fitted.

These water bottles are advertised as removing chlorine from tap water, giving it a cleaner taste. It won’t remove nutrients and minerals such as calcium and magnesium and therefore won’t solve the oestrogen problem in my drinking water.

It is far more environmentally friendly than buying small plastic water bottles, so I usually buy spring water in large bottles and fill my bobble bottle with spring water to transport (on the go). It isn’t a perfect solution, but I am making a more conscious effort to limit my exposure to chemical oestrogen. Head over to the BobbleBottle website for more information on their product.

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So to conclude this article, I have discussed  how I limit myself from chemical and environmental oestrogen. Again based on my own personal experiences I have shared with you some of the findings relating to Oestrogen Metabolism and how to limit exposure to environmental oestrogen.

Contact Life Changing Fitness for further information on how we can help with your fat loss goals

 

 

 

Leanne C

@LCaunce -Twitter

@missljcx- Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

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